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Picture of The Art of Noises
The Art of Noises
- Luigi Russolo

The Beginning: Noise and Revolution.

picture of Teleharmonium
Thaddeus Cahill's Telharmonium.

picture of intona
Luigi Russolo and Ugo Piatii with the Intonarumouri (noise machines).

The beginning of electronic music most reasonably begins with the invention of the phonograph in 1878 by Thomas Edison. Early electromechanical instruments were developed in the years of 1898-1912, the most notable being Thaddeus Cahill's Telharmonium.

At the turn of the 19th century, some composers sought to throw off the yoke of musical tradition and explore more experimental approaches to creating music. Ferruccio Busoni, in his Sketch of A New Esthetic of Music, calls for unchaining the musician from past traditions and embracing a childlike wonder of creation.

Futurism was both a social and artistic movement, originating in Italy and spanning as far as Russia and England. The movement embodies rebellion against "old" traditions, rejecting the past while embracing the future, youth, speed, and technology. These timeless concepts will drive the evolution of music and technology into the future. The Futurists were dissatisfied by the status quo, and for better or for worse, this mindset creates fertile ground for change.

Luigi Russolo, one of the first noise artists, believed the industrial revolution allowed people to appreciate more complex sounds and saw "noise music" as the replacement of traditional melodic music. It is interesting to note that his manifesto, "The Art of Noise", would be used as inspiration for the 80's electronic group, "Art of Noise." Is anything new anymore? Or just recycled?
source: wikipedia